Immigration weekly update: July 10, 2019


France: Amendments to declaration of assignment

On July 1, the decree No. 2019-555 completed the Law “Avenir Professionnel.”

The main goal of the decree is to give the Labour Authority the possibility to temporarily prohibit the delivery of services if administration fees are not paid.

Impact

Amendments have been made as follows:

  1. Declaration of assignment content: assignee sex and hourly income are now required.
  2. Contracting party should now request the following from the contracting team: proof of declaration receipt and certificate of honour certifying that the co-contracting party has, where appropriate, paid the sums due in respect of the fines related to the posting of workers.

It also specifies the competence of the Labour Authority and the document requests procedure/ information.

A ministerial decision made on June 4, 2019 outlines the list of employees for whom it is not necessary to draw up a declaration of assignment when seconded for short periods or during specific events. It also specifies activities that are exempt from the obligation.

This summary was prepared using information obtained from Peregrine Immigration Management.

Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Laxmi Vikraman, Regional Immigration Manager, EMEA.


India: In-country process changes

To provide opportunities to Indian nationals, the Indian Government is now asking for education certificates and justification letters for employment visa holders to be able to complete in-country immigration services at the Foreigners Regional Registration Office (FRRO) or Foreigners Registration Office (FRO).

The requirements are in practice for employment visa applications processed through selected overseas Indian missions.

Impact

Indian employers must explore the availability of Indian nationals, such as, advertising job openings, conducting interviews etc., before hiring a foreign national. Proof may be required to justify the employer’s efforts in hiring an Indian national, including confirmation that the required skill set is not available. This proof must be provided in the form of a letter from the Indian entity.

Looking ahead

The FRRO or FRO may deny the application submitted if the justifications specified are not satisfactory and if they discover from their investigations that an Indian national is available for the given skill set.

This summary was prepared using information obtained from the FRRO portal.

Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Debra Beynon, Regional Immigration Manager, APAC, or Bopanna Nanjappa, Immigration Manager for India.


Saudi Arabia: Premium Residency Card online application platform

The Saudi Arabian government has launched its Premium Residency Card (PRC) platform. Also called the Saudi green card, the PRC is the first permanent residence program for foreign nationals and can be applied for through the electronic platform “SAPRC”. Applicants can upload all the required documents and make electronic payments for any fees.

Impact

Foreign nationals will need to evidence the following:

  1. Medical documents
  2. Sufficient financial means
  3. No criminal record

Applicants within Saudi Arabia will need to hold legal status as well as complete all processes linked to their previous status.

Government fees – there are two PRC categories:

Permanent Card – lifetime feeSR 800,000/ US$ 213,333
Temporary Card – annual feeSR 100,000/ US$ 26,668

Looking ahead

Benefits of the PRC include:

  • PRC holders can travel in and out of Saudi Arabia without restrictions and do not need to obtain a separate visa. However, they are not subject to freedom of movement within the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) and must comply with the entry regulations of each GCC Member State.
  • PRC holders can sponsor residence and visitor visas for their spouses and immediate relatives, as well as employment visas for domestic workers.
  • PRC holders and their dependents may work in private sector companies and can change jobs. They are, however, not allowed to work in positions that are restricted to Saudi nationals and their employers are not exempt from the fees applicable to the employment of foreign nationals.

This summary was prepared using information obtained from the SAPRC platform and Arab News.

Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Laxmi Vikraman, Regional Immigration Manager, EMEA.


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