Immigration weekly update May 11, 2018

 

1. Malaysia: Application cut-off date
2. Switzerland: Quota for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens extended
3. India: Online bookings at the Czech Consulate in New Delhi
4. Consular assistance outside of the EU
5. Austria: Emergency vignette qualified as a residence title
6. Austria: Minimized requirements for police clearance certificates

 

Malaysia: Application cut-off dates 

Due to upcoming holidays, Malaysia's eXpats Service Centre and online system will be closed. Please refer to application cut-off dates. In view of the upcoming holiday season, eXpats Service Centre and the online system will be closed.
 
Please refer to these application cut-off dates.

eXpats Service Centre 

Passport submissions (via counter): June 8, 2018
Application for Foreign Knowledge Worker (via counter): June 1, 2018

Key considerations

1. Companies are strongly advised to submit any new or renewal applications while the system is accessible. 
2. Companies are also advised to apply for Special Pass renewal applications (if the applicant remains in Malaysia) before June 11, 2018 for permits that are due to expire on January 2, 2018.  
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the MYXpats Centre. 
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Santa Rao, Immigration specialist Malaysia.

Switzerland: Quota for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens extended 

The Federal Council in Switzerland has extended the yearly quota for Bulgarian and Romanian citizens who apply for Category B EU/European Free Trade Association (EFTA) Work and Residence Permits until the end of May 2019. The quota has been extended by 966 places. 
 
Since June 2017, Bulgarian and Romanian nationals can only apply for a permit if there is a quota place available. Employers should apply for a quota place that has a processing time of approximately six weeks. Upon approval of the place, the Work Permit application can be filed.

The following Bulgarian and Romanian nationals fall under the quota: 

  • Those holding a Swiss employment contract with an indefinite period of time or validity of more than one year
  • Self-employed nationals intending to work and reside in Switzerland

Key considerations

Crown World Mobility advises employers to submit quota applications as soon as possible to increase chances of obtaining one of the 966 places. 
 
The immigration authorities will reject B-Permit applications as soon as the quota has been reached. This may result in foreign nationals being asked to leave Switzerland or apply for a different permit. After June 2019, Bulgarian and Romanian nationals will no longer be asked to apply for a quota place before seeking entry into Switzerland.
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the Swiss Confederation
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Michele Giordani, Regional Immigration Manager EMEA.

India: Online bookings at the Czech Consulate in New Delhi 

Online books at the Czech Consulate in New Delhi will be temporarily suspended in March 2019 In March 2019, appointments for residence permits and employee cards were temporarily suspended. The Czech Consulate in New Delhi has now reopened bookings via email. 

Key considerations

Scheduling appointments via email is currently the only way to do so. We have received confirmation that applications are processed chronologically and applicants can only schedule one appointment per email, where family members may be included. Currently, the Consulate can only fill 30 appointments per week.  
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the Embassy of the Czech Republic in New Delhi
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Michele Giordani, Regional Immigration Manager EMEA.

Consular assistance outside of the EU

As an EU citizen, you are entitled to seek help from the embassy or consulate of any other EU country if you are “unpresented” and need advice or assistance outside of the EU.
 
Unrepresented EU citizens are entitled to receive the same consular protection as nationals of that country. This right is set out in Articles 20(2)c and 23 of the EU Treaty and Article 46 of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.
 
These new rules clarify when EU citizens in distress outside of the EU have the right to assistance from other EU countries' embassies or consulates, how EU countries should coordinate their assistance and who should pay for the costs associated with consular protection.
 
This applies in crisis situations (including disasters and armed conflict). The rules aim to make cooperation between consular authorities easier and to strengthen European citizens' rights to consular protection. Please note that the EU is working to further improve consular protection for EU citizens.
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the European Commission
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Michele Giordani, Regional Immigration Manager EMEA.
 

Austria: Emergency vignette qualified as a residence title

The Austrian emergency vignette now qualifies as a residence title The Austrian emergency vignette (Notvignette) now qualifies as a residence title according to article  2/16 of the EU Directive 2016/399.
 
As a result, emergency vignette holders in Austria can travel within the EU and Schengen area for a maximum period of 90 days (within 180 days) during its validity. 
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the European Union Law Dictionary
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Michele Giordani, Regional Immigration Manager EMEA.

Austria: Requirements for police clearance certificates 

Requirements for PCC (police clearance certificates) in Austria have been reduced.
 
When filing a long-term application (RWR-Card, Blue Card, ICT, long-term assignment), the following PCCs are required: 
  • Country of birth
  • Last country of stay before travel to Austria, if the stay was more than six months
PCCs from all countries where an employee stayed for more than six months are no longer required. 

Key considerations

It is not necessary to provide a PPC from the country of birth where applicants hold a residence permit in the Schengen area. They are however required to provide a PCC from the Schengen country where the applicant is living. 
 
This summary was prepared using information obtained from the Federal Government in Austria (verbally).
 
Disclaimer: The above information is provided for general information purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. If you have any further inquiries regarding the applicability of this information, please contact Michele Giordani, Regional Immigration Manager EMEA.